Select Page

GNPS Chapters

Just over two decades ago, the Georgia Native Plant Society was founded by people based in metro Atlanta.  Since that time, their initiative and message around the importance of native plants to our lives and the ability of individuals to make a difference locally in their protection, stewardship, rescue and propagation, has spread across Georgia and in fact across the USA.  Today our members are served in other locations across the state where local groups and providing educational information, restoration opportunities and opportunities to learn more.

There are currently three official chapters of the Georgia Native Plant Society with a couple of other applications in the pipeline.  As a member of GNPS you too can get to work and join like minded people outside of metro Atlanta by aligning yourself with one of our three chapters.  Log on through this website a as a member, select Account Settings and check the box on your profile to update your membership record.

Let us know if you are interested in learning more about how to join or start up a local chapter near you in the state of Georgia by using the Contact Us through the form to the left of this page.

Coastal Plain Chapter

Established 2014

Redbud Project Chapter

Established 2015

West Georgia Chapter

Established 2008

News & Events

Certificate in Native Plants Program now at UGA Tifton Campus

Starting January 2019 the Certificate in Native Plants program will  be offered in addition at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus.  This successful program has been running at the State Botanical Garden in Athens for many years.  Programming at the Tifton campus will concentrate on the plant communities of the inner and outer Coastal Plain of Georgia. Download the program brochure here, and register for course offerings at www.botgarden.uga.edu.

June 2018: West Georgia Chapter News

Marc Lafountain

The West Georgia Chapter has had a very busy Spring. In February our public program was “Native Plants in Carrollton Parks and on the Greenbelt”, presented by Kent Johnston, Director of Parks for Carrollton Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts, who discussed the use and maintenance of native plants in Carrollton parks and along the 18 mile Carrollton GreenBelt, a paved walking/biking trail that traverses public and private lands.

In April our Spring Workshop, “Grow your own pollinator plants from seeds: Established practices for successful seed germination and transplanting seedlings of pollinator plants”, featured James Hembree, Grounds Superintendent at the University of West Georgia and an organic farmer. This was a hands on workshop focussing on how to successfully germinate and transplant the seedings of important pollinator plants. Each person took home seeds, transplants, and finished plants.

Also in April, we had the grand opening of the Meadow Entrance to the Buffalo Creek Trail where it meets the Carrollton GreenBelt. Once only a thicket of invasive plants and an overgrown meadow, this area now features a kiosk, boardwalk, pollinator garden, rain garden, meadow, and birdhouses. Members of local organizations and government who have made our work possible joined us for this celebration. We dedicated the boardwalk to our dear friend and founding member, Wendell Hoomes, who passed away earlier in the year.

Our June public program will be “Owls of Georgia”, presented by Jim Ozier, Wildlife Biologist, Environmental and Natural Resources, Georgia Power.

Photos clockwise from upper left: Spring propagation workshop, native clematis (Clematis pitcheri), Carol Hight and Diane Rooks on May 28 hike to Flat Shoal Creek in Harris County to see the shoals spider lilies, Fire Pink (Silene virginica). Both plant photos were from the creek hike.

Photos clockwise from upper left: Spring propagation workshop, native clematis (Clematis pitcheri), Carol Hight and Diane Rooks on May 28 hike to Flat Shoal Creek in Harris County to see the shoals spider lilies, Fire Pink (Silene virginica). Both plant photos were from the creek hike.

Grand Opening of Meadow Entrance to Buffalo Creek Trail: April 17, 2018

On Tuesday, April 17, starting at 6:30 pm, members of the West Georgia Chapter of GNPS will hold the grand opening of the Meadow Entrance to the Buffalo Creek Trail as part of their 10th anniversary as an organization.  The trail is part of the larger, 40-acre Buffalo Creek Outdoor Education Center, created by the Forestry Service and now entrusted to the West Georgia Chapter by the Carroll County Board of Commissioners for a term of 99 years.  Invited guests include city and country government officials, master gardeners, numerous local garden clubs, civic groups, and local funding organizations. GNPS board members and some long-time key GNPS friends of the project have also been invited.

Buffalo Creek is probably the largest of the GNPS restoration sites. The Meadow Entrance was once an overgrown, often impassable link to a sewer line.  Restoration workers have removed invasives and added a kiosk, bike rack, boardwalk, pollinator garden, split rail fencing, and birdhouses.  Soon a rain/bog garden will go in around the boardwalk.  This area links the Buffalo Creek Trail to the Carrollton GreenBelt, an 18 mile walking/bilking trail the circles Carrollton.  It’s similar to the Atlanta Beltline, but it runs through both public and private lands. If you cannot make this event, try to find another time to visit! Follow the project on it’s own restoration site page.

The Hike Inn | Raffle Prize at the 2018 GNPS Symposium

The Georgia Native Plant Society is very pleased to offer a drawing at the Symposium for a FREE night at one of Georgia’s greatest getaways, The Hike Inn.

The easy-to-moderate, five-mile path starting from the top of Amicalola Falls is among the most popular mountain trails in the North Georgia Blue Ridge. And one of its most beautiful and diverse. The two-to-four hour hike crosses small streams, traverses scenic ridges and ambles through stands of mountain laurel and rhododendron. The Hike Inn – open year round – is a sustainably designed Georgia State Park facility nestled in the Chattahoochee National Forest, just a few hours north of Atlanta. Its four main buildings offer twenty private guest rooms, hot showers, fresh linens and home-cooked meals.The Hike Inn’s mission is to make experiencing nature easy, and help protect it through education and recreation.

The Hike Inn, Amicalola Falls State Park

Raffle tickets will be $5 each at the Symposium (prize value $210). The winner must be present at the conclusion of the Symposium when the drawing will take place.

GNPS Menu

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This